The Amazing Spider-Man, Issue Twenty-Nine

Writer Nick Spencer

Artist Francesco Manna

Colorist Carlos Lopez

Letterer VC’s Joe Caramagna

Cover Artists Ryan Ottley and Nathan Fairbairn

Immortal Wraparound Variant Cover Artists Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, and Frank D’Armata

Designer Anthony Gambino

Look how flexible Spidey is.

This was an enjoyable and fun read with some great advice about love delivered to us from the accumulated wisdom gathered inside the skull of our beloved Aunt May. Peter Parker, and all who read this book, should take head and apply it to their own relationships. I think a few years ago I would have thought that what she had to say about love and keeping a relationship working was a little cliche and rote. Now that I myself have a few years of marriage under my belt I honestly couldn’t agree more.

The writer of this book, Nick Spencer, has been doing solid work on his run so far, and this issue was in keeping with his work ethic. As I mentioned above, Aunt May gives Spider-Man some well thought out advice through the course of about two pages, these pages were excellent examples of some excellent comic book writing. Mr. Spencer, as can all good writers, not only manages to write a fun and entertaining book, but grounded it in experiences that we all can empathize with, me especially. I don’t know if that’s something he’s doing consciously, though I’d be surprised if he wasn’t, so as to keep the book feeling a little more grounded in reality while at the same time creating a fun story centered around a man that dresses up like a spider and fights crime, an idea that is so fanciful that reality can’t even find where the ground is.

Francesco Manna, the books artist, put in solid work as well. Mr. Manna has a clean and bold looking style that looks very nice on Spider-Man, and on everything else. He illustrates movement and action smoothly and in a way that makes it feel dynamic  Though I do have to admit that sometimes Peter’s face, with his mask off, looks just a tad too young than what matches up with my mind, but that’s my problem, not Mr. Manna’s. Oddly enough, however, my favorite piece of his art in this issue involved neither movement nor action, it was a very still and somber piece, and wasn’t very bright either. On the very last page, a full page at that, Peter is shown sitting on his bed and looking despondently at an object he holds in the open palm of his left hand. Unfortunately I can’t describe anymore than that, for I’d end up spoiling something pretty big in the world of Spider-Man, so you should buy this book and see for yourself.

The colorwork in this book laid itself gracefully atop the arts skeletal structure and did its job, making bones move. Colorist Carlos Lopez did a fine job throughout this issue.

After the last page reveal I’m anxious to see what happens, but sadly I fear we’ll have to wait until after the Absolute Carnage tie-in(s?). Such is comics.

After you’re done moping about how you’re constantly screwing things up with your lover, make a pit-stop at the bookstore, get this book, then…

Read It!

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